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Title When discussing the structural inequality faced by black America, one can expect to talk about the long history of discrimination and oppression that black people have faced in the United States (Hope et. al2015). This includes topics such as slavery, Jim Crow laws, housing segregation, and employment discrimination. Additionally, the conversation might touch on how these historical factors have led to disparities in wealth, education, and health care that black Americans still experience today. Abstract There are a number of ways in which black Americans face structural inequality. One is in the form of housing discrimination, which can limit their access to quality homes and neighborhoods (Roscigno et. al 2009). Studies have shown that black Americans are more likely to be shown lower-quality homes and neighborhoods than white Americans when they are house-hunting, and they are also more likely to be steered into predominately black neighborhoods. This can have a significant impact on black Americans’ ability to accumulate wealth, as quality housing is one of the most important assets that families have. Another way in which black Americans face structural inequality is in the form of employment discrimination. (Higginbotham & Weber, 1999) Studies have shown that black Americans are more likely to be unemployed than their white counterparts, and when they are employed, they are often paid less for the same work. Additionally, black Americans are more likely to work in lower-paying jobs and to have fewer opportunities for advancement. This can make it difficult for black Americans to make ends meet and to build economic security for themselves and their families. Additionally, black Americans are more likely to be incarcerated than their white counterparts, and they often receive harsher sentences for the same crimes (Gregory, 1995). This is due in part to racial bias in the criminal justice system, as well as to the fact that black Americans are more likely to live in poverty-ridden neighborhoods that are heavily policed. This structural inequality can have a profound impact on black Americans’ life chances and their ability to achieve economic and social success. All of these factors combine to create a system of structural inequality that black Americans must grapple with on a daily basis. This inequality can have a profound impact on black Americans’ ability to lead prosperous and fulfilling lives. Introduction Purpose of the study The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural inequality faced by black America. The study will focus on the socioeconomic disparities between blacks and whites in America, and will attempt to identify the root causes of these disparities. Additionally, the study will examine the impact of structural inequality on black Americans’ health and well-being. Structural inequality refers to the systematic disadvantage of certain groups of people within a society (Bailey et. al., 2017). In the United States, blacks have long been subjected to structural inequality, which has manifested in the form of economic, social, and political disparities between blacks and whites. The socioeconomic disparities between blacks and whites in America are well-documented. Blacks have higher rates of poverty and unemployment than whites, and they earn less money on average than whites. Blacks are also more likely to live in segregated neighborhoods and to attend under-resourced schools (Gabriel et. al 2021). These disparities are not simply the result of individual choices or personal failings; rather, they are the product of centuries of discrimination and exclusion. The roots of structural inequality in America can be traced back to the country’s history of slavery and racism (Feagin & Ducey, K. 2018). Blacks were forcibly brought to America as slaves, and they were subjected to brutal treatment and denied basic rights and freedoms. After the Civil War, blacks were ostensibly freed from slavery, but they continued to face discrimination and oppression. Jim Crow laws relegated blacks to a second-class status, and blacks were excluded from participating in the mainstream economy. This history of discrimination and exclusion has had a profound impact on black Americans’ economic opportunities and social status(Feagin & Ducey, K. 2018). The effects of structural inequality are far-reaching and have a profound impact on black Americans’ health and well-being. Studies have shown that living in poverty can have a negative impact on physical and mental health. Additionally, the stress of dealing with discrimination and exclusion can lead to health problems. The cumulative effect of these factors is that black Americans have worse health outcomes than whites. They are more likely to suffer from chronic diseases, and they have shorter life expectancies (Murray et. al, 2005) Research question What is the relationship between structural inequality and black Americans? Central concepts There are a number of ways to conceptualize the structural inequality faced by black America. One framework is to consider the historical and contemporary ways in which black Americans have been systematically disadvantaged relative to white Americans. Another framework is to think about the ways in which institutions and social structures perpetuate inequality between black and white Americans. One way to think about the historical disadvantaging of black Americans is to consider the legacy of slavery and Jim Crow segregation. Both of these systems were designed to deliberately keep black Americans in a position of economic, social, and political inferiority. The effects of these system are still felt today, as black Americans continue to experience higher levels of poverty, unemployment, and incarceration than white Americans. A second way to conceptualize the structural inequality faced by black America is to consider the ways in which institutions and social structures perpetuate inequality. For example, housing segregation is a major contributor to inequality between black and white Americans. This is because black Americans are more likely to live in poverty-ridden neighborhoods with limited access to good schools, jobs, and other resources. This, in turn, makes it harder for black Americans to escape poverty and achieve economic mobility. In sum, there are a number of ways to conceptualize the structural inequality faced by black America. By understanding the historical roots of inequality as well as the ways in which contemporary institutions and social structures perpetuate it, we can begin to develop policies and programs that address this problem in a more holistic and effective way. Objectives To measure the structural inequality faced by black America, we will use the following objectives: 1. To identify the socioeconomic factors that contribute to inequality 2. To quantify the extent of inequality using indicators such as income, wealth, education, and employment 3. To assess the impact of inequality on black Americans’ life outcomes, such as health, housing, and economic security Prior findings There is a long history of structural inequality faced by black America. This includes a history of discrimination in housing, education, employment, and other areas. There have been a number of programs and policies put in place to address this inequality, but the problem persists. The proposed problem is that black Americans continue to face disparities in many areas of life. This includes disparities in income, wealth, education, employment, and health. While there have been some progress in recent years, much more needs to be done to address these disparities. Plans The structural inequality faced by black America is a complex issue that requires a multi-faceted approach to address. One way to start addressing the issue is by advocating for public policies that will help to close the economic gap between black and white Americans. This can be done by supporting policies that create more jobs and opportunities for black Americans, increase access to quality education and job training programs, and provide financial assistance to black-owned businesses. Additionally, we can work to create more inclusive and diverse workplaces, neighborhoods, and social networks. By taking these steps, we can begin to create lasting change that will help to reduce the structural inequality faced by black America. Source of Idea The source of the idea of structural inequality faced by black America is a long history of discrimination and exclusion from opportunities in the United States (Dill & Zambrana, 2020). Blacks have been subjected to various forms of discrimination in housing, education, employment, and other areas of life. This has led to a persistent pattern of inequality in black communities, where residents have fewer resources and opportunities than those in white communities. Structural inequality is a type of inequality that is caused by the ways in which our society is organized. It can refer to things like the unequal distribution of resources, or the ways that certain groups are treated differently in our society. Structural inequality can have a big impact on people’s everyday lives, and can lead to things like economic disparities, or social and political exclusion. Importance of the study The study of structural inequality is important because it can help us to understand some of the disparities that exist in our society. It can also help us to identify ways to address these disparities. For example, if we know that certain groups are disadvantaged due to structural inequality, we can work to create policies or programs that help to level the playing field. Structural inequality is an important issue to study because it affects a large number of people in our society. It is also an issue that is often overlooked or misunderstood. By studying structural inequality, we can begin to understand the root causes of some of the disparities that exist in our society, and take steps to address them. Literature Review In the United States, black Americans have long been subjected to structural inequality. This inequality manifests in many ways, including disparities in income, education, employment, housing, and health care (Galabuzi, 2004). These disparities are often compounded by racism, prejudice, and discrimination, which further limit black Americans’ ability to access the resources and opportunities they need to succeed. Income inequality is a major problem facing black Americans. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median household income for black Americans was $39,490 in 2017, compared to $61,372 for white Americans. This disparity is even more pronounced when looking at median household income by race and ethnicity. In 2017, Hispanic households had a median income of $50,486, while Asian households had a median income of $81,431. Black Americans’ median household income was just 62.5% of white Americans’ median household income in 2017 (Stone et.al 2019) The income inequality between black and white Americans is also evident when looking at poverty rates. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the poverty rate for black Americans was 22.0% in 2017, compared to 8.7% for white Americans. This disparity is even more pronounced when looking at poverty rates by race and ethnicity. In 2017, the poverty rate for Hispanic Americans was 18.3%, while the poverty rate for Asian Americans was just 11.0%. Black Americans’ poverty rate was more than double the poverty rate for white Americans in 2017 (Lutfiyya et. al 2008) Education is another area where black Americans face structural inequality. According to data from the U.S. Department of Education, black students are more likely than white students to be suspended or expelled from school. In the 2013-14 school year, black students made up 16.7% of the student population, but they made up 31.6% of students who were suspended from school. Black students were also 3.5 times more likely than white students to be expelled from school. The disparities in education don’t end there. Black students are also less likely to have access to quality education. In the 2013-14 school year, black students made up 16.7% of the student population, but they made up just 9.3% of students in advanced placement classes. Black students were also less likely than white students to be enrolled in gifted and talented programs. Employment is another area where black Americans face structural inequality. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate for black Americans was 7.5% in 2018, compared to 3.7% for white Americans. This disparity is even more pronounced when looking at unemployment rates by race and ethnicity. In 2018, the unemployment rate for Hispanic Americans was 5.0%, while the unemployment rate for Asian Americans was just 2.5%. Black Americans’ unemployment rate was more than double the unemployment rate for white Americans in 2018. Housing is another area where black Americans face structural inequality. According to data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, black households are more likely than white households to live in substandard housing. In 2015, black households made up 30.8% of all households that were living in substandard housing. This disparity is even more pronounced when looking at substandard housing by race and ethnicity. In 2015, Hispanic households made up 25.0% of all households that were living in substandard housing, while Asian households made up just 11.2%. Black Americans were more than three times as likely as white Americans to live in substandard housing in 2015. Health care is another area where black Americans face structural inequality. According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, black Americans are more likely than white Americans to die from preventable causes. In 2015, the death rate from preventable causes was 1,814.6 per 100,000 black Americans, compared to 813.5 per 100,000 white Americans. This disparity is even more pronounced when looking at death rates by race and ethnicity. In 2015, the death rate from preventable causes was 1,162.5 per 100,000 Hispanic Americans, while the death rate from preventable causes was just 647.0 per 100,000 Asian Americans. Black Americans were more than twice as likely as white Americans to die from preventable causes in 2015. The structural inequality that black Americans face is evident in many areas of life. Black Americans have long been subjected to income inequality, educational disparities, employment discrimination, housing segregation, and health care disparities. These disparities are often compounded by racism, prejudice, and discrimination, which further limit black Americans’ ability to access the resources and opportunities they need to succeed. Theoretical Framework As a sociological theory, structural inequality refers to the ways in which different social groups are advantaged or disadvantaged within a society (Lin,2000). It is often used to explain disparities in areas such as income, education, and health. In the context of black America, structural inequality refers to the ways in which black people are disadvantaged relative to other groups in society (Dill & Zambrana, 2020). This can be seen in the higher rates of poverty and unemployment among black Americans, as well as the lower rates of educational attainment and health. Structural inequality is a major factor shaping the experiences of black Americans. It is important to consider when studying the literature on black America, as it can help to explain some of the disparities that are seen (Noguera, 2003) It is also important to consider when conducting research on black America, as it can help to identify areas where disparities exist and to develop interventions to address them. REFERENCES Hope, E. C., Skoog, A. B., & Jagers, R. J. (2015). “It’ll never be the white kids, it’ll always be us” black high school students’ evolving critical analysis of racial discrimination and inequity in schools. Journal of Adolescent Research, 30(1), 83-112. Roscigno, V. J., Karafin, D. L., & Tester, G. (2009). The complexities and processes of racial housing discrimination. Social Problems, 56(1), 49-69. Higginbotham, E., & Weber, L. (1999). Perceptions of workplace discrimination among Black and White professional-managerial women. Latinas and African American women at work: Race, gender, and economic inequality, 327-56. Gregory, J. F. (1995). The crime of punishment: Racial and gender disparities in the use of corporal punishment in US public schools. Journal of Negro Education, 454-462. Bailey, Z. D., Krieger, N., Agénor, M., Graves, J., Linos, N., & Bassett, M. T. (2017). Structural racism and health inequities in the USA: evidence and interventions. The lancet, 389(10077), 1453-1463. Gabriel, R., Leibbrand, C., Hess, C., & Crowder, K. (2021). Race, Adolescent Exposure to Segregation, and Adulthood Residential Mobility into and out of Lower-Poverty Neighborhoods. Spatial Demography, 9(3), 309-339. Feagin, J. R., & Ducey, K. (2018). Racist America: Roots, current realities, and future reparations. Routledge. Murray, C. J., Kulkarni, S., & Ezzati, M. (2005). Eight Americas: new perspectives on US health disparities. American journal of preventive medicine, 29(5), 4-10. Dill, B. T., & Zambrana, R. E. (2020). Critical thinking about inequality: An emerging lens. In Feminist Theory Reader (pp. 108-116). Routledge. Galabuzi, G. E. (2004). Social exclusion. Social determinants of health: Canadian perspectives, 235-251. Stone, A. H., MacDonald, J. H., Joshi, M. S., & King, P. J. (2019). Differences in perioperative outcomes and complications between African American and white patients after total joint arthroplasty. The Journal of arthroplasty, 34(4), 656-662. Lutfiyya, M. N., Garcia, R., Dankwa, C. M., Young, T., & Lipsky, M. S. (2008). Overweight and obese prevalence rates in African American and Hispanic children: an analysis of data from the 2003–2004 National Survey of Children’s Health. The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, 21(3), 191-199. Lin, N. (2000). Inequality in social capital. Contemporary sociology, 29(6), 785-795. National Institute of Child Health, & Human Development (US). (2000). Health disparities: Bridging the gap. The Development. Noguera, P. A. (2003). The trouble with Black boys: The role and influence of environmental and cultural factors on the academic performance of African American males. Urban education, 38(4), 431-459.

ANALYSIS OF FACTORS INFLUENCING THE PURCHASE INTENTION OF CROSS-BORDER E-COMMERCE PLATFORM CUSTOMERS IN ARAB COUNTRIES

Abstract By notifying users of pertinent goods and services, internet systems aim to promote e-commerce. In this study proposal, we propose a novel method for identifying the factors that influence Arab customers’ decision to shop online. The idea for this study came from earlier research on online purchasing, recommendation systems, and internet-based information systems. Surveys published on e-commerce websites were used to collect additional quantitative data. The early studies and recommendations were examined by systems and information systems experts to conduct a conceptual and descriptive examination of the data generated by most petite square structural equation modelling. Usability, diversity, accuracy, suggestion quality, satisfaction, and ease of use are just a few of the variables that significantly impact customers’ desire to purchase products offered by recommender systems. The strategy and results outlined here will be advantageous to website design, users, customers, and recipients following factors that support their value. User retention could be reliably predicted based on whether or not users were satisfied with the websites. The study’s findings are thoroughly analyzed in this paper. Their theoretical and managerial ramifications are discussed by practitioners concerned with the long-term expansion and performance of the ecommerce sector.

Virtual charity auction Project for the Children Defense Fund

A charity auction is an auction held for the purpose of raising money for a charitable cause. These auctions can be held by businesses, organizations, or individuals, and typically feature items donated by local businesses or individuals. Charity auctions are a popular way to fundraise, as they offer an opportunity for the community to come together and support a good cause. Charity auctions are important for a number of reasons. First, they provide a way for businesses and individuals to raise money quickly and easily. Second, they allow donors to buy items that are unique and interesting, increasing the chance that these items will be sold. Third, charity auctions often feature high-value items that can generate a lot of money for the charity. Finally, charity auctions can be a fun way for people to gather and socialize. They are an excellent way to get people involved in supporting a good cause, and they provide a unique opportunity for donors to purchase unique and interesting items.

Project Goals

The project will accomplish three objectives, which will address the key health issues of Baltimore City. In addressing the issue of STIs, the project will accomplish three short-term and one long-term objective. The primary short-term goal is to ensure that all individuals within Baltimore City are educated about safe practices and STDs. The intermediate goal is also essential to reducing the spread of STIs as it will help individuals identify an infection and treat it accordingly. It is safe to say that if individuals are able to take a test for an STD and know when they have been infected, they will be able to get tested when needed for treatment. The long-term goal is for all individuals in Baltimore City to be tested for an STI when needed and treated accordingly. The project will strongly focus on educating adolescents because their health behaviors are key drivers in the problem of STIs. Baltimore City is a largely youthful community with a high number of individuals in the 15-24 year old age group. The project will educate adolescents on the risks of STIs, how to reduce their risk, and provide them with condoms to reduce the spread of an STD.

Solved Free : COSC2436 – FA LAB5 – Data Structure : Generic Binary Search Tree BST and Generic

COSC2436 – FA LAB5 – Data Structure: Generic Binary Search Tree BST and Generic AVLTree Demo TITLE: – COSC2436 – FA LAB5 – Data Structure: Generic Binary Search Tree BST and Generic AVLTree Demo Read input file, Write to file – Data Structure: Generic Binary Search Tree BST and Generic AVLTree Demo Time to complete: …

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Forecasting Chicken Wing Demand

Exercise 1: Forecasting chicken wing demand The following data represents the weekly demand for chicken wings at a local restaurant during the past six weeks: Week 1 2 3 4 5 6 Demand 650 521 563 735 514 596 Complete the following: a.    Forecast the demand for week 7 using a five-period Moving average. b.    Forecast …

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Write a program that will open a data file (“data.csv”) containing multiple rows and columns (no missing value)

COMP-5411 FA & FB Fall 2019 Assignment 1 This is NOT a group assignment Due Date: Wednesday, October 9, 11:59 pm Late submission is NOT allowed. 1) Write a program that will open a data file (“data.csv”) containing multiple rows and columns (no missing value). Assume both your program and the data file are in …

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CMSC 341 Data Structures — Projects & Support — Fall 2019

Project 2: Range Average Query Due: Tuesday, October 8, before 9:00 pm Addenda You may find it easier to store sums (rather than averages) in the RAQ and BlockRAQ data structures. If you choose to do this, your query() function must convert sums to averages. Also, your dump() function should print sums, not averages. You …

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