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Drugs, Justice and Society

The production, distribution, and consumption of illicit drugs and substances are a nightmare that many nations across the world struggle to deal with in modern society. Illicit drugs define both legalized and criminalized substances that do not adhere to the outlined standards of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The production and distribution of these Article Error (TS illicit drugs make it nearly impossible to curb the global crisis due to the sophistication of the strategy implementation intricacies. The purpose of this study is to provide a detailed discussion of the 4 major stages of the production and distribution of illicit drugs in modern society- cultivation, importation, wholesale distribution, and distribution.

Cultivation

Illicit drug cultivation is the farming of outlawed plants such as the poppy plant which Article Error Ers can be used to produce powerful narcotics like morphine and heroine or cannabis which is primarily for marijuana. Many countries have criminalized drug cultivation, including the United States under Section 23 of the Drugs Misuse and Trafficking Act of 1985 (Thilagaraj & Karthikeyan, 2019). The study continues to clarify that the main drug cultivation processes include possessing prohibited drugs, supplying illegal drugs and plants, and watering outlawed plants on your property. When found guilty of illicit drug cultivation, penalties vary according to the number and type of plants involved. For instance, more evidence from Thilagaraj & Karthikeyan (2019) reveals that minimal possession of cannabis plants could attract a maximum of 2 years in prison, or a $2,200 fine while massive cannabis amounts can equal close to a decade of imprisonment, and or a $220,000 heavy fine. These penalties can be severe depending on additional external factors such as distribution.

Importation

Illicit drug importation is the direct or indirect engagement and facilitation of drugs and substances trafficking from one country to another. Over the years, criminals have incepted creative and unsuspicious tactics of disguising illicit drugs and substances as normal food items such as groceries and fish, as well as staffing them into live animals, like pets. As many nations have outlawed illicit drug importation, thorough security searches are conducted within prime import and export locations such as harbors and airports with the hope of sniffing out the traffickers before they get into the country. According to the National Crime Agency (2022), drug trafficking is the cardinal revenue source for organized criminal activity across the globe. It means that criminals work day in and day out to invent new ways to traffic drugs past Prep. T importation security checks for motives such as controlling supply routes, acquiring firearms for protection, and further crime, including modern slavery, sex trafficking, and immigration issues.

Wholesale Distribution

The third stage of illicit drug production, distribution, and consumption is wholesale distribution which entails a massive supply of outlawed substances after successful cultivation and importation processes. Once cultivated, getting the drugs through the borders is the next Article Error (ETS dilemma and once that is solved, the criminals must now find ways for which the drugs will Article Error (ETS reach the infamous street “drug lords” or high-ranking narco-traffickers. Whole distribution requires controlling or managing a respective number of sizeable distributors that will facilitate the next state – distribution. Drug barons or kingpins receive the largest share of illicit drugs through wholesale distribution at a slightly fair price before hiring distributors to complete the trade with higher prices (Gallagher, et al., 2020). Drug trafficking is a federal crime and thus, drug barons are tried as statutory criminals, just like rapists, money launderers, and first-degree Sp. (ETS murderers.

Distribution

Distribution is the final piece of the puzzle but it requires consumers for maximum Dup. ETS Missing”,”TS efficiency. By this point, the illicit drugs and substances have gone passed through all the Article Error (ETS dilemmas and they are now in the country. Law enforcement agencies may get word of this distribution plan too late considering how the illegal commodities got into the country and even if they got ahead of the distribution plans, many police officers and other government officials are easily paid huge money to look the other way (Levinthal, 2020). Corruption is an unwritten piece of this final puzzle because distributors have anticipated brushing shoulders with the law. This means that consumers are also made aware of a possible confrontation with the police or resistance from the public. Drug distribution is finalized by breaking down the wholesale products into smaller and more affordable stocks for different consumer needs and income levels

Conclusion

Article Error The production, distribution, and consumption of illicit drugs and substances remain to be a global social and economic pandemic owing to the persistence of the trade for the better part of a millennium. Drug trafficking is one of the deadliest statutory crimes in contemporary society and when found guilty, defendants face years of imprisonment depending on the nature, intention, and country, the defendants may never get a chance for parole. Major organized crime activities are funded by income generated from illicit drug production, distribution, and consumption and this explains why the nightmare never seems to end

 

 

 

References

Gallagher, C. T., Atik, S. K., Isse, L., & Mann, S. K. (2020). Doctor or drug dealer? International legal provisions for the legitimate handling of drugs of abuse. Drug Science, Policy and

Law, 6, 2050324519900070.

Levinthal, C. F. (2020). Drugs, society and criminal justice. Pearson.

National Crime Agency. (2022). Drug trafficking. NCA.

https://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/what-we-do/crime-threats/drug-trafficking

Thilagaraj, R., & Karthikeyan, S. (2019). Drug Abuse and Trafficking. MJP Publisher.