Movie review

One of the weakest aspects of the film is its pacing. The film feels very slow and deliberate. which can be a bit off-putting for some viewers. Additionally, the film’s plot is fairly simplistic I and not particularly original. The weakest aspect of the film is its pacing.

Faculty of Arts and Humanities Module Title: Creative Enterprise Module Code: A303PA Due Date Word Count: 2019 words

The Coventry Smartphone company was incepted in 2022. The company deals in designing, developing, manufacturing, and selling high-end smartphones, with outstanding features that would meet the current dynamic needs and specification of the United Kingdom tech market. Headquartered in Coventry, UK, the company is a sole proprietor, ran by its founder. The company strives in a vision to inspire the world and create a future through innovative product designs and technologies. Since its inception in January, 2022, Coventry Smartphone company has demonstrated tremendous growth in the global market for smartphones. This has attributed to its loyal customer base, strong brand image, a wide range of product portfolio as well as a robust presence in the UK market. Even though Apple and Samsung-the leading competitors of Coventry electronics, the enterprise continue to boast as a new leader in the United Kingdom’s Smartphone market. Currently, the company proves to enjoy over 18 percent of global shipment compared to Apple’s 11 percent of Smartphones shipped in the UK (Ahmad and Zhang, 2022). Consequently, despite the intense competition in the UK market, especially from Apple Inc., Coventry Smartphone company has maintained its strategic position in the UK market due to its products’ low switching cost for customers in addition to its strong bargain for consumers compared to its competitors.

Criminal Trial Opening Statement

Hi, your honor, ladies and gentlemen of the jury. My name is (Student’s Name), and the colleague’s name is (insert). We have a contentious charge before you. The case is about John Smith’s employee. The accused person is facing a charge of dealing with the prohibited drug cocaine. He carried three bottles of liquor that later turned out to be components of cocaine. It is your duty today to listen to the facts of the case and reach a verdict as to the guilt of John Smith’s employee. It is the position of the Crown that Smith’s employee, on 1st July 2018, he went to a lone place within the airport and was in possession of three bags of bottles of cocaine liquor. Therefore, the defendant committed the offense of smuggling illegal drugs into the country because she acknowledged having bought them in Colombia.

Indian Horse

1. HOOK Line For the hook, we shall use a rhetorical question. This will have the effect of having the reader analyze the situation from my perspective. Furthermore, it will enable me to influence the reader’s state of mind, pushing them to look for the answers to the rhetorical question. Consequently, as the paper progresses and answers are provided, the reader can find satisfaction in their curiosity being quenched, and the summary as well as the themes of the book supplement this.

Indian Horse

1. HOOK Line For the hook, we shall use a rhetorical question. This will have the effect of having the reader analyze the situation from my perspective. Furthermore, it will enable me to influence the reader’s state of mind, pushing them to look for the answers to the rhetorical question. Consequently, as the paper progresses and answers are provided, the reader can find satisfaction in their curiosity being quenched, and the summary as well as the themes of the book supplement this.

Indian Horse

1. HOOK Line For the hook, we shall use a rhetorical question. This will have the effect of having the reader analyze the situation from my perspective. Furthermore, it will enable me to influence the reader’s state of mind, pushing them to look for the answers to the rhetorical question. Consequently, as the paper progresses and answers are provided, the reader can find satisfaction in their curiosity being quenched, and the summary as well as the themes of the book supplement this.

Indian Horse

1. HOOK Line For the hook, we shall use a rhetorical question. This will have the effect of having the reader analyze the situation from my perspective. Furthermore, it will enable me to influence the reader’s state of mind, pushing them to look for the answers to the rhetorical question. Consequently, as the paper progresses and answers are provided, the reader can find satisfaction in their curiosity being quenched, and the summary as well as the themes of the book supplement this.

Indian Horse

1. HOOK Line For the hook, we shall use a rhetorical question. This will have the effect of having the reader analyze the situation from my perspective. Furthermore, it will enable me to influence the reader’s state of mind, pushing them to look for the answers to the rhetorical question. Consequently, as the paper progresses and answers are provided, the reader can find satisfaction in their curiosity being quenched, and the summary as well as the themes of the book supplement this.

            MUS 89- Lesson 6

Describe the elemental rhythmic characteristic of Caribbean music (“clave”). To what source can it be traced? The clave is a rhythm that forms salsa music. It is significant to the square rhythms that overwhelm a lot of European music due to its African roots. The clave is comprised of areas of strength with three notes (otherwise called the “tresillo”) and a powerless measure with two notes (otherwise called the “two-three”) (Zahner, 2019). These design outcomes start with one or the other measure, which are alluded to as “three-two” or “two-three.”

case study

Management is the process of controlling or dealing with things or people. In any organization there must be a person to take charge and monitor the day to day running of any organization or institution. A manager should know his/her employees where the team members show little passion in their work the manager should use authoritarian style but if the employees show effort and willingness to work the leader should use participative management. A manager should also consider internal and external factors that may affect the chosen management approach. An organization’s running may be affected by size of organization, technology being used, and management approach. A leader should be able to identify departments, workgroups and business units and should encourage team work between these. A leader should also collaborate with employees to determine the best management approach this enables management and regular employees ti work as a whole. Also leaders should simplify work being done by employees and produce a conducive environment for them.Employees should also be given a fair wage according to their jobs this boosts their work morale and encourages them to work harder.

case study

Management is the process of controlling or dealing with things or people. In any organization there must be a person to take charge and monitor the day to day running of any organization or institution. A manager should know his/her employees where the team members show little passion in their work the manager should use authoritarian style but if the employees show effort and willingness to work the leader should use participative management. A manager should also consider internal and external factors that may affect the chosen management approach. An organization’s running may be affected by size of organization, technology being used, and management approach. A leader should be able to identify departments, workgroups and business units and should encourage team work between these. A leader should also collaborate with employees to determine the best management approach this enables management and regular employees ti work as a whole. Also leaders should simplify work being done by employees and produce a conducive environment for them.Employees should also be given a fair wage according to their jobs this boosts their work morale and encourages them to work harder.

Recognizing and Responding to Patient Deterioration.

Abstract Introduction Various deaths recorded in healthcare facilities can be prevented (Kotwal, Montgomery, Miles, Conklin, Hall, & McChrystal, 2017). Rapid response teams are being implemented in many hospitals globally to ” rescue” deteriorating patients before their conditions move from bad to worse (Cho, Kwon, Kwon, Lee, Park, Jeon, & Oh, 2020). This paper aims to establish the changes in the views and characteristics of rapid response systems (RRS) from the moment Standard 9 of the NSQHS began to be implemented.

What is English as a Medium of Instruction (EMI)?

What is EMI? English as a medium of instruction (EMI) is a method to teach academic subjects in countries were English is not the first language. According to Shimauchi’s (2018) book, this teaching system has become a growing phenomenon in non-English countries, since many of them are in processing of educational transformation. However, it has been possible to notice a clear inequality of ideas about the program and what it provides. In addition, the impact that this program is producing, have caught the attention of many experts, academics, educators, linguistic teachers, and students, which had led them to analyze EMI’s ideologies and affects in different contexts. Thus, this annotated bibliography is compiled to tackle the perceptions and approaches about EMI program across countries. To get a glimpse at EMI’s worldwide observation and its impact, difficulties, and some recommendations, Chalmers, H. (2019) will please us. To discuss over the Asian’s countries perceptions and approaches, we may present the Galloway, Kriuknow and Numajiri’s (2017) academic report. To see more deeply the impact and development of EMI on Japan and China; we are going to use Galloway’s (2017) interview report. To analyze what the Peruvians perceptions and approaches towards EMI are; we will use Niño-Murcia’s (2003) research article. Likewise, J.E. Dearden & Macaro’s (2016) research article will provide us an investigation about teacher’s perceptions towards EMI in 3 different countries as Polonia, Austria, and Italy. Finally, Shohamy (2012) will supply a worldwide observation and approaches about the EMI’s types of learning process and some notable issues about the program within non-English countries. What is EMI? English as a medium of instruction (EMI) is a method to teach academic subjects in countries were English is not the first language. According to Shimauchi’s (2018) book, this teaching system has become a growing phenomenon in non-English countries, since many of them are in processing of educational transformation. However, it has been possible to notice a clear inequality of ideas about the program and what it provides. In addition, the impact that this program is producing, have caught the attention of many experts, academics, educators, linguistic teachers, and students, which had led them to analyze EMI’s ideologies and affects in different contexts. Thus, this annotated bibliography is compiled to tackle the perceptions and approaches about EMI program across countries. To get a glimpse at EMI’s worldwide observation and its impact, difficulties, and some recommendations, Chalmers, H. (2019) will please us. To discuss over the Asian’s countries perceptions and approaches, we may present the Galloway, Kriuknow and Numajiri’s (2017) academic report. To see more deeply the impact and development of EMI on Japan and China; we are going to use Galloway’s (2017) interview report. To analyze what the Peruvians perceptions and approaches towards EMI are; we will use Niño-Murcia’s (2003) research article. Likewise, J.E. Dearden & Macaro’s (2016) research article will provide us an investigation about teacher’s perceptions towards EMI in 3 different countries as Polonia, Austria, and Italy. Finally, Shohamy (2012) will supply a worldwide observation and approaches about the EMI’s types of learning process and some notable issues about the program within non-English countries. Chalmers, H. (2019) The Role of the First Language in English Medium Instruction. University Oxford, UK. Retrieved from. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/330566949_The_Role_of_the_First_Language_ in_English_Medium_Instruction The purpose of this academic research by Hamish Chalmers is to inform about the EMI development as an only English program and persuade recommendations to encourage policymakers, school leaders, and teachers to consider the information given when making decision about the implement of EMI education in their local context. The author mentioned that the objectives for EMI education are shaped by the perspectives of policymaker in each country as Spain, Argentina, Hon Kong, Czech Republic, etc. Chlamers (2019) claims that the EMI’s program growing popularity provides a unique opportunity for policymakers and school leaders to lead the way in emphasizing the importance of supporting the develop of students’ first language (L1) alongside English, since having access to the L1 enriches engagement, nurtures well-being, and strengthen identity. The method the author used to support the research was by present deep investigations, researches, data collection and analysis. The intended audience are academics, linguistic teachers, students interested in linguistic, EMI’s faculty members, and Schools and University’s directors who have EMI in their teaching pedagogy. The relationship between the readers and the author is formal as the Oxford University Press provide this academic research. Dearden & Macaro. (2016). Higher education teachers’ attitudes towards English medium instruction: A three-country comparison. Studies in Second Language Learning and Teaching. Retrieved from. https://www.ceeol.com/search/article-detail?id=430056 The purpose of this research article by Julie Dearden and Ernesto Macaro is to inform and compare the attitudes of university teachers engaged in teaching their academic subject through the EMI program in Austria, Italy, and Poland. The authors explained that the choice of these three countries was an opportunity to provide them a different and potentially European context. Moreover, they added that according to the interviewees, indeed the EMI is on the increase in non-English countries. Dearden and Macaro (2016) claim that there is considerable variance in the beliefs and attitudes of EMI teachers with EMI being introduced in their countries. The inside nation variety goes from practically inadequate excitement to significant worry about the speed, absence of organization, low semantic capability, and general help for EMI programs. The method they used to support their research was doing 25 teacher interviews and surveys. The intended audience are academics, students interested in linguistics, EMI’s researchers and universities’ directors. The relationship established between the authors and the readers is completely formal as this research article belongs to the department of English Studies of the Adam Mickiewicz University. Galloway et al. (2016). Internationalization, higher education, and the growing demand for English: an investigation into the English medium of instruction (EMI) movement in China and Japan. British Council. Retrieved from. https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/sites/teacheng/files/H035ELTRA Internationalisation_HE_andthegrowingdemandforEnglish A4_FINAL_WEB.pdf The purpose of this academic report by Nicola Galloway, Jaroslaw Kriukow and Takuya Numajiri; is to inform about how EMI is implemented and conceptualized in the Japanese and Chinese context. Also, the report mentions EMI’s benefits and challenges that involves in higher education and wants to persuade about a range of practical suggestions and recommendations for different stakeholders. The authors analyze the EMI’s growth in both countries and examinate the ideologies towards it. Galloway, Kriukow and Numnajiri (2016) claim that both students and faculty members in Japan and China, have different attitudes and perceptions about EMI. For example, according to the authors, many faculty members believe that EMI programs should use mother tongue as a useful pedagogical tool; however, students do not favor the use of mother tongue in class. The method that they used to support the report was interviews, focus groups with staff and students, and questionnaires. The intended audience are academics, linguistic teachers, students interested in linguistics, stakeholders, materials writers, and policymakers. The relationship established between Galloway, Kriuknow and Numajiri and the readers is formal. Galloway, N. (2017). How Effective is English as a Medium of Instruction (EMI)? . British Council. Retrieved from. https://www.britishcouncil.org/voices-magazine/how-effectiveenglish-medium-instruction-emi The purpose of this interview report by the British Council is to inform about Galloway’s research about the EMI’s efficiency and to talk about the different perspectives, development, and impact about the program in two Asian countries. Galloway (2017) wanted to find out other people’s attitudes, approaches to, forces behind and points of view towards EMI; in order to do that, she did a research focusing on Japan and China. She found out that in Japan students had begun taking English from a more youthful age and had more experience abroad. Additionally, that when understudies select EMI program to improve their English capability, they expect a degree of English language support. Therefore, the author claims that universities need to provide a clear rationale for EMI programs, what they hope the students will learn, and how much English will be used. The method that Galloway used to support her work was by developing questionnaires, interviews, and focus groups with staff and students at various universities. The intended audience are academics, EMI’s students and school and university’s directors. The relationship between Galloway and the readers is formal because this interview was published on the British Council web page. Niño-Murcia, M. (2003). “English is like the dollar”: hard currency ideology and the status of English in Peru. World English, 22(2), 121-142. Retrieved from https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1467-971X.00283 The purpose of this academic research by Mercedes Niño-Murcia is to inform about the Peruvian’s perceptions, ideologies and misinterpretations towards the English language and persuade to be aware and concern about it. Concerning the educational system, Niño-Murcia (2003) observed that English gets more attention than any other foreign language and that private schools provide a higher level of English. Therefore, she pointed out that achieving proficiency in English in Peru continues to be a privilege of the upper classes, who attended bilingual schools or study and travel abroad. The author claims that there is a clear preference, respect, and desire about the English language; and states that Peruvians seems to think that if you do not know English, you will not prosper. The method she used to support her research was to present graphic statistics, do interviews and recollect local testimonies from an agro-pastoral village in the Andes, at the periphery of Lima and from an upper-class shopping area. The intended audience are academics, students interested in linguistics, researchers about EMI in different countries and sociologists. The relationship between the author and the readers is formal as Mercedes Niño-Murcia is a professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Iowa. Shohamy, E. (2012). A critical perspective on the use of English as a medium of instruction at universities. Linguistic Landscape: Expanding the Scenery. Retrieved from http://ebookcentral.proquest.com The purpose of this part of the book by Elana Shohamy is to present a critical perspective of EMI taught and to inform about the student’s difficulties and issues presented during EMI’s learning process, also to encourage a serious research towards EMI to improve its implementation before it is adopted at a wider scale, to guarantee an egalitarian education. The author explained and did a deeply analysis about the consequences on learning content via second language (L2) for immigrant students; using a school language which is different than home language; learning content via L2 for majority students; and learning through EMI at universities. Shohamy (2012) claims that certain EMI’s impact points lead to negative consequences such as: discrimination towards students with low levels of English. The method the author used to support her book was to present analysis about 4 settings of Medium of Instruction, used statistics, demonstrated three main issues towards EMI, and cited different authors and experts. The intended audience of the book are critics of EMI, academics, linguistic teachers, students interested in linguistics, schools and university’s directors and researchers of EMI’s effectiveness. The relationship established between Shohamy and the readers is formal, as this is part of her book “Linguistic Landscape: Expanding the Scenery”. References Shimauchi, S. (2018). English-Medium Instruction in the Internationalization of Higher Education in Japan: Rationales and Issues. Educational Studies in Japan: International Yearbook. Retrieve from. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1182867.pdf The purpose of this academic research by Hamish Chalmers is to inform about the EMI development as an only English program and persuade recommendations to encourage policymakers, school leaders, and teachers to consider the information given when making decision about the implement of EMI education in their local context. The author mentioned that the objectives for EMI education are shaped by the perspectives of policymaker in each country as Spain, Argentina, Hon Kong, Czech Republic, etc. Chlamers (2019) claims that the EMI’s program growing popularity provides a unique opportunity for policymakers and school leaders to lead the way in emphasizing the importance of supporting the develop of students’ first language (L1) alongside English, since having access to the L1 enriches engagement, nurtures well-being, and strengthen identity. The method the author used to support the research was by present deep investigations, researches, data collection and analysis. The intended audience are academics, linguistic teachers, students interested in linguistic, EMI’s faculty members, and Schools and University’s directors who have EMI in their teaching pedagogy. The relationship between the readers and the author is formal as the Oxford University Press provide this academic research. Teaching. Retrieved from. https://www.ceeol.com/search/article-detail?id=430056 The purpose of this research article by Julie Dearden and Ernesto Macaro is to inform and compare the attitudes of university teachers engaged in teaching their academic subject through the EMI program in Austria, Italy, and Poland. The authors explained that the choice of these three countries was an opportunity to provide them a different and potentially European context. Moreover, they added that according to the interviewees, indeed the EMI is on the increase in non-English countries. Dearden and Macaro (2016) claim that there is considerable variance in the beliefs and attitudes of EMI teachers with EMI being introduced in their countries. The inside nation variety goes from practically inadequate excitement to significant worry about the speed, absence of organization, low semantic capability, and general help for EMI programs. The method they used to support their research was doing 25 teacher interviews and surveys. The intended audience are academics, students interested in linguistics, EMI’s researchers and universities’ directors. The relationship established between the authors and the readers is completely formal as this research article belongs to the department of English Studies of the Adam Mickiewicz University. The purpose of this academic report by Nicola Galloway, Jaroslaw Kriukow and Takuya Numajiri; is to inform about how EMI is implemented and conceptualized in the Japanese and Chinese context. Also, the report mentions EMI’s benefits and challenges that involves in higher education and wants to persuade about a range of practical suggestions and recommendations for different stakeholders. The authors analyze the EMI’s growth in both countries and examinate the ideologies towards it. Galloway, Kriukow and Numnajiri (2016) claim that both students and faculty members in Japan and China, have different attitudes and perceptions about EMI. For example, according to the authors, many faculty members believe that EMI programs should use mother tongue as a useful pedagogical tool; however, students do not favor the use of mother tongue in class. The method that they used to support the report was interviews, focus groups with staff and students, and questionnaires. The intended audience are academics, linguistic teachers, students interested in linguistics, stakeholders, materials writers, and policymakers. The relationship established between Galloway, Kriuknow and Numajiri and the readers is formal. The purpose of this interview report by the British Council is to inform about Galloway’s research about the EMI’s efficiency and to talk about the different perspectives, development, and impact about the program in two Asian countries. Galloway (2017) wanted to find out other people’s attitudes, approaches to, forces behind and points of view towards EMI; in order to do that, she did a research focusing on Japan and China. She found out that in Japan students had begun taking English from a more youthful age and had more experience abroad. Additionally, that when understudies select EMI program to improve their English capability, they expect a degree of English language support. Therefore, the author claims that universities need to provide a clear rationale for EMI programs, what they hope the students will learn, and how much English will be used. The method that Galloway used to support her work was by developing questionnaires, interviews, and focus groups with staff and students at various universities. The intended audience are academics, EMI’s students and school and university’s directors. The relationship between Galloway and the readers is formal because this interview was published on the British Council web page. The purpose of this academic research by Mercedes Niño-Murcia is to inform about the Peruvian’s perceptions, ideologies and misinterpretations towards the English language and persuade to be aware and concern about it. Concerning the educational system, Niño-Murcia (2003) observed that English gets more attention than any other foreign language and that private schools provide a higher level of English. Therefore, she pointed out that achieving proficiency in English in Peru continues to be a privilege of the upper classes, who attended bilingual schools or study and travel abroad. The author claims that there is a clear preference, respect, and desire about the English language; and states that Peruvians seems to think that if you do not know English, you will not prosper. The method she used to support her research was to present graphic statistics, do interviews and recollect local testimonies from an agro-pastoral village in the Andes, at the periphery of Lima and from an upper-class shopping area. The intended audience are academics, students interested in linguistics, researchers about EMI in different countries and sociologists. The relationship between the author and the readers is formal as The purpose of this part of the book by Elana Shohamy is to present a critical perspective of EMI taught and to inform about the student’s difficulties and issues presented during EMI’s learning process, also to encourage a serious research towards EMI to improve its implementation before it is adopted at a wider scale, to guarantee an egalitarian education. The author explained and did a deeply analysis about the consequences on learning content via second language (L2) for immigrant students; using a school language which is different than home language; learning content via L2 for majority students; and learning through EMI at universities. Shohamy (2012) claims that certain EMI’s impact points lead to negative consequences such as: discrimination towards students with low levels of English. The method the author used to support her book was to present analysis about 4 settings of Medium of Instruction, used statistics, demonstrated three main issues towards EMI, and cited different authors and experts. The intended audience of the book are critics of EMI, academics, linguistic teachers, students interested in linguistics, schools and university’s directors and researchers of EMI’s effectiveness. The relationship established between Shohamy and the readers is formal, as this is part of her book “Linguistic Landscape: Expanding the Scenery”.

Plag

Answer & Explanation Verified Solved by verified expert “The answer in this Problem is Camembert Pierrot, Gorgonzola Telino, Gnocchi di nonna Alice, Chai with Sum of total Discount of 5065 (1577 + 1397 + 1263 + 828 = 5065)” Step-by-step explanation Here are the List of all Product with Sum – Quantity arranged in Descending Order Camembert Pierrot 1577 Raclette Courdavault 1496 Gorgonzola Telino 1397 Gnocchi di nonna Alice 1263 Pavlova 1158 Rhönbräu Klosterbier 1155 Guaraná Fantástica 1125 Boston Crab Meat 1103 Tarte au sucre 1083 Chang 1057 Fløtemysost 1057 Sir Rodney’s Scones 1016 Lakkalikööri 981 Jack’s New England Clam Chowder 981 Alice Mutton 978 Pâté chinois 903 Konbu 891 Manjimup Dried Apples 886 Steeleye Stout 883 Chai 828 Outback Lager 817 Mozzarella di Giovanni 806 Inlagd Sill 805 Scottish Longbreads 799 Chartreuse verte 793 Original Frankfurter grüne Soße 791 Uncle Bob’s Organic Dried Pears 763 Geitost 755 Tourtière 755 Gumbär Gummibärchen 753 Thüringer Rostbratwurst 746 Louisiana Fiery Hot Pepper Sauce 745 Ikura 742 Wimmers gute Semmelknödel 740 Teatime Chocolate Biscuits 723 Perth Pasties 722 Gudbrandsdalsost 714 Queso Cabrales 706 Singaporean Hokkien Fried Mee 697 Rössle Sauerkraut 640 Côte de Blaye 623 Nord-Ost Matjeshering 612 Sirop d’érable 603 Gula Malacca 601 Ipoh Coffee 580 Tunnbröd 580 Spegesild 548 Carnarvon Tigers 539 Escargots de Bourgogne 534 Maxilaku 520 Røgede sild 508 Sasquatch Ale 506 Filo Mix 500 Zaanse koeken 485 Chef Anton’s Cajun Seasoning 453 Vegie-spread 445 Ravioli Angelo 434 Tofu 404 Northwoods Cranberry Sauce 372 Schoggi Schokolade 365 Gustaf’s Knäckebröd 348 Queso Manchego La Pastora 344 Aniseed Syrup 328 NuNuCa Nuß-Nougat-Creme 318 Sir Rodney’s Marmalade 313 Grandma’s Boysenberry Spread 301 Chef Anton’s Gumbo Mix 298 Longlife Tofu297 Mascarpone Fabioli 297 Röd Kaviar 293 Louisiana Hot Spiced Okra 239 Valkoinen suklaa 235 Laughing Lumberjack Lager 184 Chocolade 138 Gravad lax 125 Genen Shouyu 122 Mishi Kobe Niku 95 Total Result 51317

Business

The Lord of the Rings Reflection on Second World War Name Course Date Discussion Epic battles occur between a supremely evil entity and a coalition of the earth’s weakest peoples in The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Humans, elves, dwarves, and even ghosts form an alliance to combat Sauron’s ruthless repression of evil and preserve the free world from slavery. During the Second World War, the work was written in several stages between 1937 and 1949. There are many connections and influences throughout the trilogy, notwithstanding Tolkien’s denials that the trilogy is an allegory of the war. As for any hidden significance or message, there was none in the author’s purpose, as Tolkien explains in the foreword (Wiki, 2017). Many of its sources date back to well before World War II, and the conflict and its aftermath have influenced very little of what they contain. It is neither symbolic nor current. “Applicability” can be utilized even if the author denies allegory, as he says in the preface: “I think many confuse “applicability” with “allegory, but the one lives in the reader’s freedom, and the other resides in the author’s alleged supremacy.” I may discuss the novel’s plot and how World War II influences it as a reader. A major conflict between our planet and Middle-earth is destroying many nations and races. Even though some people are far away from the battles, they cannot remain unaffected by the emergence of evil since it will eventually harm them (Bloom, 2008). When Tolkien was born amid a rapidly changing world, he wrote the trilogy. ‘Old world’ culture and lifestyle were rapidly transforming. The burgeoning industry was displacing England’s traditions and tranquil urban areas one by one. It was just a matter of time before the old aristocratic families and traditions faded away, and with them, the world order began to change. The elves’ power begins to dwindle in the story, much like this transition (J.R.R, 2011). Middle Earth’s noble and intelligent immortal elves once ruled the earth with immense authority. Nonetheless, as the story unfolds, humans replace them. Once they leave Middle-Earth for Valinor, a mortal-free island, they isolate themselves from the spread of evil. Hobbits call Shire home, the setting for the first book in the trilogy. It’s easy to imagine the Shire as the perfect example of a traditional English village, and the Hobbits that dwell there are simple farmers who lead simple lives. This is eerily reminiscent of pre-war rural England, with a peaceful way of life about to be upended by an invasion from the east. A group of allied forces led by the United States of America destroyed Germany after World War I by defeating the German army. A harsh and restricting Treaty of Versailles had to be signed by Germany after being defeated by the Allies. In this way, the country was “chained like a raged dog,” ready to attack. Furthermore, Germany was compelled to pay $442 billion in restitution, eventually finished in 2010. Although the treaty’s severe restrictions led to Germany’s subsequent explosion and the outbreak of World War II, they did not destroy the country. In the Second Age, Elves and Men fought Sauron’s minions in the War of the Last Alliance. Like post-war Germany, Sauron and the ring had lost their influence, but they had not been eradicated. As time went on, both Germany and Mordor recovered quickly and could attack again, driving the entire world into a state of war and turmoil. Nazi Germany and Mordor, the Over-Industrialized Evil Power (Bloom, 2008). The existence of supreme evil power marks both World War II and the Middle-third earth’s age events. It is conceivable to view an over-industrialized Germany during World War II; this is similar to the scenario in Isengard and Mordor, where trees are cut down for fuel, as demonstrated in the example of a forest fire. One of the most beautiful valleys in Middle-earth was once Saruman’s base of operations against the Rohirrim, Isengard. He hacked down its trees and built deep trenches to breed the Uruk-hai and Orcs. “I looked on it and saw that, whereas it had once been green and fair, it was now filled with pits and gorges… Overall, in his works, a dark smoke hung.” (Wiki, 2017). German steel war machines began to be produced after the industrial revolution, resulting in damage to the environment. War machines were built with the help of deportees and thousands of other prisoners of war compelled to work on defenses against an impending invasion by the Allies. Nazi SS troops, like the Holocaust’s dumb rabble of orcs, followed orders without even questioning them, which exhibits stereotyped evil throughout history. As a result of the institutions in place in these types of regimes, people lose their ability to make rational decisions, common sense, and even conscience. The Germans’ concentrated force of tanks, infantry, artillery, and airpower overran the Allies; France’s Maginot Line was supposed to be an effective deterrent during the Second World War. Known as “Blitzkrieg” or “lightning war,” this technique involved a large concentration of motorized troops moving at breakneck speed (Bloom, 2008). Sauron’s armies are known for their use of physical force, advanced weaponry, and speed in battle. With only their crude weapons and horses, the Free Peoples of Middle Earth could not defeat the Orcs, Nazgul, Mumakil, Uruk-hai, battering rams, and wargs, the attack towers, the flying Nazgul, and the Mumakil (battle elephants) (Wiki, 2017). As depicted in the novel, the Free Peoples of Middle-earth are a shadow of their former selves. To resist this alliance, the Free People must come together to have the strength to oppose the dark forces. Even the tiniest of powers are required in this alliance. References Bloom, H. (2008). The Lord of the Rings: New Edition. In Google Books. Infobase Publishing. https://books.google.co.ke/books?id=m5OF2rFh1wgC&pg=PA162&dq=the+lord+of+rings+perspective+of+ww2&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiVuKLCuOH3AhUL_BoKHUdHC2EQ6AF6BAgLEAI#v=onepage&q=thelordofrings J. R. R. Tolkien. (2011, September 16). Why Did Tolkien Write The Lord of the Rings? Https://Www.xenite.org/. https://middle-earth.xenite.org/why-did-tolkien-write-the-lord-of-the-rings/ Wiki. (2017). War of the Ring. The One Wiki to Rule Them All. https://lotr.fandom.com/wiki/War_of_the_Ring

Ww2

The Lord of the Rings Reflection on Second World War Name Course Date Discussion Epic battles occur between a supremely evil entity and a coalition of the earth’s weakest peoples in The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Humans, elves, dwarves, and even ghosts form an alliance to combat Sauron’s ruthless repression of evil and preserve the free world from slavery. During the Second World War, the work was written in several stages between 1937 and 1949. There are many connections and influences throughout the trilogy, notwithstanding Tolkien’s denials that the trilogy is an allegory of the war. As for any hidden significance or message, there was none in the author’s purpose, as Tolkien explains in the foreword (Wiki, 2017). Many of its sources date back to well before World War II, and the conflict and its aftermath have influenced very little of what they contain. It is neither symbolic nor current. “Applicability” can be utilized even if the author denies allegory, as he says in the preface: “I think many confuse “applicability” with “allegory, but the one lives in the reader’s freedom, and the other resides in the author’s alleged supremacy.” I may discuss the novel’s plot and how World War II influences it as a reader. A major conflict between our planet and Middle-earth is destroying many nations and races. Even though some people are far away from the battles, they cannot remain unaffected by the emergence of evil since it will eventually harm them (Bloom, 2008). When Tolkien was born amid a rapidly changing world, he wrote the trilogy. ‘Old world’ culture and lifestyle were rapidly transforming. The burgeoning industry was displacing England’s traditions and tranquil urban areas one by one. It was just a matter of time before the old aristocratic families and traditions faded away, and with them, the world order began to change. The elves’ power begins to dwindle in the story, much like this transition (J.R.R, 2011). Middle Earth’s noble and intelligent immortal elves once ruled the earth with immense authority. Nonetheless, as the story unfolds, humans replace them. Once they leave Middle-Earth for Valinor, a mortal-free island, they isolate themselves from the spread of evil. Hobbits call Shire home, the setting for the first book in the trilogy. It’s easy to imagine the Shire as the perfect example of a traditional English village, and the Hobbits that dwell there are simple farmers who lead simple lives. This is eerily reminiscent of pre-war rural England, with a peaceful way of life about to be upended by an invasion from the east. A group of allied forces led by the United States of America destroyed Germany after World War I by defeating the German army. A harsh and restricting Treaty of Versailles had to be signed by Germany after being defeated by the Allies. In this way, the country was “chained like a raged dog,” ready to attack. Furthermore, Germany was compelled to pay $442 billion in restitution, eventually finished in 2010. Although the treaty’s severe restrictions led to Germany’s subsequent explosion and the outbreak of World War II, they did not destroy the country. In the Second Age, Elves and Men fought Sauron’s minions in the War of the Last Alliance. Like post-war Germany, Sauron and the ring had lost their influence, but they had not been eradicated. As time went on, both Germany and Mordor recovered quickly and could attack again, driving the entire world into a state of war and turmoil. Nazi Germany and Mordor, the Over-Industrialized Evil Power (Bloom, 2008). The existence of supreme evil power marks both World War II and the Middle-third earth’s age events. It is conceivable to view an over-industrialized Germany during World War II; this is similar to the scenario in Isengard and Mordor, where trees are cut down for fuel, as demonstrated in the example of a forest fire. One of the most beautiful valleys in Middle-earth was once Saruman’s base of operations against the Rohirrim, Isengard. He hacked down its trees and built deep trenches to breed the Uruk-hai and Orcs. “I looked on it and saw that, whereas it had once been green and fair, it was now filled with pits and gorges… Overall, in his works, a dark smoke hung.” (Wiki, 2017). German steel war machines began to be produced after the industrial revolution, resulting in damage to the environment. War machines were built with the help of deportees and thousands of other prisoners of war compelled to work on defenses against an impending invasion by the Allies. Nazi SS troops, like the Holocaust’s dumb rabble of orcs, followed orders without even questioning them, which exhibits stereotyped evil throughout history. As a result of the institutions in place in these types of regimes, people lose their ability to make rational decisions, common sense, and even conscience. The Germans’ concentrated force of tanks, infantry, artillery, and airpower overran the Allies; France’s Maginot Line was supposed to be an effective deterrent during the Second World War. Known as “Blitzkrieg” or “lightning war,” this technique involved a large concentration of motorized troops moving at breakneck speed (Bloom, 2008). Sauron’s armies are known for their use of physical force, advanced weaponry, and speed in battle. With only their crude weapons and horses, the Free Peoples of Middle Earth could not defeat the Orcs, Nazgul, Mumakil, Uruk-hai, battering rams, and wargs, the attack towers, the flying Nazgul, and the Mumakil (battle elephants) (Wiki, 2017). As depicted in the novel, the Free Peoples of Middle-earth are a shadow of their former selves. To resist this alliance, the Free People must come together to have the strength to oppose the dark forces. Even the tiniest of powers are required in this alliance. References Bloom, H. (2008). The Lord of the Rings: New Edition. In Google Books. Infobase Publishing. https://books.google.co.ke/books?id=m5OF2rFh1wgC&pg=PA162&dq=the+lord+of+rings+perspective+of+ww2&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiVuKLCuOH3AhUL_BoKHUdHC2EQ6AF6BAgLEAI#v=onepage&q=thelordofrings J. R. R. Tolkien. (2011, September 16). Why Did Tolkien Write The Lord of the Rings? Https://Www.xenite.org/. https://middle-earth.xenite.org/why-did-tolkien-write-the-lord-of-the-rings/ Wiki. (2017). War of the Ring. The One Wiki to Rule Them All. https://lotr.fandom.com/wiki/War_of_the_Ring

History development

Frontline for Sama Summary Name Course Date Discussion The story of Waad Al-journey Kateab as a journalist and rebel during the Syrian revolt is the film’s centerpiece. Sama Al-Kataeb is the daughter of Hamza Al-Kataeb, a doctor who is one of the few remaining in Aleppo, and she and her husband raised their daughter during the Syrian Civil War. After five years in Aleppo, Syria, the video depicts Waad al-life Kataeb’s five years of life in Aleppo, including the Battle of Aleppo (Pbs, 2022). When the uprising began in 2011, she was an 18-year-old economics student at the University of Aleppo. She falls in love, births her first daughter Sama, and learns to negotiate motherhood as the crisis engulfs the city (Pbs, 2022). Both she and her husband, a doctor working at one of the city’s few remaining hospitals, are faced with the agonizing option of whether or not to evacuate for their lives or stay behind to aid the innocent victims of war. Comparison between different cultural perspectives on policing, Courts and corrections between Syria and the USA In both Syria and the USA, jail harms public health. Prison has serious health repercussions for inmates and their families. Most offenders have pre-existing health issues due to their low-income, under-educated backgrounds and lack of access to competent healthcare. In overcrowded prisons, inmates’ health deteriorates due to lack of room, nutrition, and sanitation. Mental illness, HIV/AIDS, TB, hepatitis B and C, and other STDs are the most common causes of illness and death in jail. Suffocation, malnutrition, and diarrhea are common. TB is up to 100 times more common in prisoners than in general (UN, 2021). Preventing HIV transmission in prisons is prioritized in nations with prominent drug use and other high-risk behaviors. Many ailments affect both inmates and prison staff. People in prisons, jails, and other correctional facilities are more likely than the general population to have chronic illnesses like diabetes, heart disease, and mental illness (UN, 2021). Mass incarceration influences health inequalities across communities, not just behind prison walls. Drug trafficking and crime rate between Slovenia, Germany and USA The theft of vehicles, people and drugs is a significant crime in Slovenia. Among them are money laundering and gun trafficking. Slovenia is a prominent transit and source country for human trafficking. Forced labor, sex trafficking, and begging are common. Slave labor is increasingly frequent, especially in construction. Fewer victims are reported, but it is unclear if this is due to increased human trafficking or better detection measures. By 2020, cannabis will be involved in around 59% of all drug offences in Germany (UN, 2021). Germany has also emphasized drug trafficking issues. As a result, crime rates have risen. Due to the outbreak, pubs and clubs closed, reducing heroin and ecstasy-related crimes. Cocaine trafficking increased 9.6% year on year in 2020. Drug trafficking and crime rates in the USA were as follows: 1 298 more homicides in 2021 than in 2020. Gun assaults increased in 2021. Assaults with guns increased by 4%, and aggravated assaults by 8%. Robberies will rise in 2020. In 2021, burglary, theft, and drug offence rates fell 6%. Vehicle theft increased by 14% in 2021 (UN, 2021). Between 2020 and 2021, domestic violence climbed 4%. The tiny sample size warrants caution. As most programs in the US are dependent on criminal justice’s vast fields of professions, students pursuing this career are more advantaged and have a high possibility chance of thriving in future. Political analysts are high in demand, and other skilled crime investigators are in matters concerning political crimes. This is different in other countries as a crime in some countries is state-sponsored, and pursuing such careers could be so risky as it acts as a way of investigating the government. References Pbs. (2022). FRONTLINE | For Sama | Season 2019 | Episode 19. Www.pbs.org. https://www.pbs.org/video/sama-theatrical-version-dgbhlm/ United Nations. (2021). World Drug Report 2021. United Nations: Office on Drugs and Crime. https://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/wdr2021.html